CESKY ENGLISH

The B line

The recently renovated Národní třída station

Being the youngest line of the Prague Metro, the B line was opened to the public in 1985. It consists of five segments. The first segment, built in 1985, connects Florenc to Smíchovské nádraží, the third (chronologically second) segment extended the line to Nové Butovice in 1988, the second (chronologically third) segment, opened in 1990, runs between the Florenc and Českomoravská stations, the fifth (chronologically fourth) segment connected Zličín to the Prague Metro in 1994, and the line’s fourth (chronologically fifth) segment, constructed in 1998, connected Černý Most to Českomoravská, excluding the Hloubětín and Kolbenova stations, which were added to the segment later.

The “old” B line stations have a relatively restrained unified design. Namely, the stations that could fall into this category are the stations of the first and the second segments, together with Jinonice, Kolbenova, and Hloubětín. All the above-mentioned stations are three-bore stations, dominated by glass panels, situated on the walls behind the tracks and on the pillars, and Ekrona panels, covering the remaining surfaces. Each station has its own specific color, which is used for the tiling and sometimes for the escalators as well. The Můstek and Florenc transfer stations, together with the Českomoravská terminal stations nonetheless differ from this concept, being tiled with ceramic. Besides, the Karlovo náměstí and Jinonice stations are famous for being tiled with remarkable glass panels by František Vízner. Some stations are completely atypical, namely the monolithic Smíchovské nádraží and Palmovka stations, built using the cut-and-cover method. All stations constructed before 1990 are decorated with art pieces. Works of art can be as well found on the line’s second segment, opened in the year 1990, yet in smaller quantity.

A mosaic at Karlovo náměstí

As far as communist ideology is concerned, the old B line stations are more similar to the A line than to the C line. On the one hand, the influence of the communist regime is clearly visible in the decoration of the stations. Namely, the Jinonice station (formerly Švermova ) literal translation: Šverma Station was dedicated to communist journalist Jan Šverma and the design of the Anděl station (formerly Moskevská ) literal translation: Moscow Station is absolutely unique amongst the Prague Metro stations, as it was built by Soviet engineers as a sign of the Czechoslovak-Soviet Frendship, while the same year, the Пражская (Prazhskaya) literal translation: Prague Station station appeared in Moscow, constructed by the Czech Metrostav. On the other hand, the B line first saw the light of day at the time of the downfall of the communist regime, which resulted in the Nové Butovice station (formerly Dukelská ) literal translation: Dukla Station serving as a memorial to the soldiers killed in the Battle of the Dukla Pass, despite the fact that it was originally to have been called Únorového vítězství , literal translation: Victorious February Station which in the end seemed too daring a name. Similarly to the A line, several medieval motifs can be found on the B line, particularly at the downtown stations. The line’s second segment was constructed shortly before the Velvet Revolution, and therefore includes a number of artworks, yet the Antonína Zápotockého terminal station literal translation: Antonín Zápotocký Station was opened after the Revolution under the name Českomoravská . literal translation: Bohemian-Moravian Station

While the Jinonice station still represents the “old” style, the two remaining stations of the B line’s third segment (Radlická and Nové Butovice) are the result of a turnaround in design in the late 1980s. The stations are no longer grandiose and monumental in the manner of the Moscow stations. Instead, they are decorated with matt glass panels and show a completely different approach to lighting. This design continues further in the 1990s, including the fifth segment to Zličín, whereas the stations of the fourth segment to Černý Most, including Kolbenova and Hloubětín, are inspired by the bright three-bore stations, characteristic of the early segments of the B line. The above-ground Černý Most station, attached to an eponymous bus terminal, differs from all other stations, having an absolutely bizarre and overcomplicated design. Similarly, the above-ground Rajská zahrada station is unique not only amongst the B line stations, but also within the whole Prague Metro, its gigantic glass-walled building allowing the platforms to be placed atypically above each other. The latest two segments of the B line do not contain any artworks.

This text is followed by the list of artworks located on the B line, divided into two charts. The first one contains artworks which are still accessible, whereas the second one contains art which has been removed or is no longer accessible to the public. Some removed or inaccessible artworks may not be on the list.

The existing artworks

Station Name of artwork Type of artwork Author
Palmovka Soukolí
(The Gears ) This is a literal translation.
steel sculpture ak. soch. doc. Alexius Appl
Invalidovna Sport
(Sport ) This is a literal translation.
stained glass ak. mal. Eva Heřmanská
Invalidovna The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. ceramic sculputres ak. mal. Lýdie Hladíková,
Děvana Mírová, Marie Rychlíková
Florenc (clock) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. metal sculpture nár. umělec Rufolf Svoboda
Můstek (arrow) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. ceramic relief ak. soch. Helena Samohelová
Můstek Praha
(Prague ) This is a literal translation.
ceramic relief ak. soch. Lubomír Šilar
Můstek (drinking fountain at Jungmann Sq.) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. drinking fountain ak. soch. prof. Jiří Kryštůfek
Můstek (drinking fountain at Children's House) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. drinking fountain ing. arch. Karel Fořtl,
ing. arch. Miroslav Suchý
Karlovo náměstí The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. stained glass ak. mal. Ivanka Slavíčková
Karlovo náměstí The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. glass object ak. soch. Jaroslav Štursa
Karlovo náměstí (drinking fountain) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. drinking fountain ak. soch. Luboš Růžička
Karlovo náměstí Karel IV. a jeho doba
(Charles IV and His Age ) This is a literal translation.
mosaic nár. umělec Radomír Kolář,
František Tesař
Anděl (Moscow – Prague) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. bronze inscription The author is unknown.
Anděl The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. 8 bronze reliefs The author is unknown.
Radlická The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. granite and bronze sculpture ak. soch. Zdeněk Hošek
Radlická The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. grille ak. soch. doc. Alexius Appl
Nové Butovice Pomník dukelským hrdinům
(Memorial to the Dukla Heroes ) This is a literal translation.
sandstone sculpture ak. soch. Milan Vácha

The removed or inaccessible artworks

Station Name of artwork Type of artwork Author
Florenc (park) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. sculptures, mosaics, fountain ak. mal. Martin Sladký,
ing. arch. Jiří Laskavý
Náměstí Republiky The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. stained glass ak. mal. Jan Grimm
Náměstí Republiky The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. glass columns ak. soch. Václav Cígler
Náměstí Republiky (fountain) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. fountain ing. arch. Anna Hübschmannová
Národní třída The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. glass relief ak. mal. Stanislav Libenský
Národní třída Kontakty
(Contacts ) This is a literal translation.
glass sculpture ak. mal. Stanislav Libenský,
ak. mal. Jaroslava Brychtová
Národní třída (fountain) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. fountain ak. soch. Pavel Trnka,
ing. arch. Zbyněk Kabelík
Anděl (Moscow) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. mosaic The author is unknown.
Smíchovské nádraží Pohled do krajiny
(A Glance of the Landscape ) This is a literal translation.
cermaic relief ak. soch. Marta Taberyová
Smíchovské nádraží The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. sculpture ak. soch. Aleš Vašíček
Smíchovské nádraží (fountains) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. fountains ak. soch. Jan Hendrych
Jinonice (Jan Šverma) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. relief ak. soch. Karel Houska
Nové Butovice (garden sculpture) The work does not have an official name or the name is unknown. ceramic sculpture ak. soch. Aleš Werner

Sources:

  1. REJDAL, Tomáš. Metroweb.cz [online]. [cit. 2018-02-21]. Dostupné z: https://www.metroweb.cz/
  2. Revoluce v metru: Z Gottwaldovy Vyšehrad a z Moskevské Anděl. Česká televize [online]. 14. 12. 2014 [cit. 2018-02-21]. Dostupné z: http://www.ceskatelevize.cz/ct24/regiony/1005506-revoluce-v-metru-z-gottwaldovy-vysehrad-a-z-moskevske-andel
  3. 40 let pražského metra. In: Studio ČT24 [televizní pořad]. Moderuje Jakub ŽELEZNÝ. ČT24, 8. 5. 2014 20:00. Dostupné též z: http://www.ceskatelevize.cz/ivysilani/10101491767-studio-ct24/214411034000059-40-let-prazskeho-metra/

  4. The sources of information about artworks are listed on the webpages dealing with individual stations.